A Good Comrade

Author: Roger Gough
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857712985
Size: 39.67 MB
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A Good Comrade. Traitor and reformer, persecutor and victim - Janos Kádár, Hungary’s Communist leader from 1956 to 1988, had one of the most dramatic and influential political careers of the twentieth century. From poverty to power and then from prison back to power, Kádár played a leading role in both the rise and the ultimate collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe._x000D_ _x000D_ In the first English biography of Kádár since his death, Roger Gough analyses the scope and limits of reform in Kádár ’s Hungary, showing how the failure of his policies contributed to the collapse of European communism. Gough leads the reader through the world of underground political activism, the turbulent days of revolution and Stalinist Hungary, deftly illuminating the man at the centre of the storm._x000D_ _x000D_ After siding with the Soviet Union and overseeing the brutal suppression of his country’s uprising, Kádár transformed his position to win domestic and international respect through political concessions, attempts at economic reform and a gradual opening to the West. But when the prosperity of ‘goulash communism’ proved illusory and foreign debt mounted, Kádár was ousted – ending his political career haunted by the long-suppressed crimes of his past._x000D_ _x000D_ Half a century after Kádár ’s betrayal of the 1956 uprising captured the world’s attention, Gough paints a vivid portrait of the withdrawn, austere and tenacious man who dominated Hungarian political life for three decades. Reminiscent of a Shakespearean tragedy, this is the dramatic story of an ambiguous yet powerful personality who left his mark not just on Hungary but also on Europe and the international history of Communism.

A Good Comrade

Author: Roger Gough
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9781845110581
Size: 74.63 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A Good Comrade. Few political lives have been as dramatic, or as marked by sudden changes of fortune, as that of Janos Kadar. Was Kadar--Hungary's communist leader from 1956 to 1988--an ambitious, ruthless party functionary or a tragic visionary? In this, the first biography in English since the collapse of the Soviet bloc, Roger Gough paints a vivid picture of Kadar's personality and career, while analyzing his significance for Hungary and his place in the history of European communism.

The 1956 Hungarian Revolution

Author: Csaba Békés
Publisher: Central European University Press
ISBN: 9789639241664
Size: 24.89 MB
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The 1956 Hungarian Revolution. If there had been all-news television channels in 1956, viewers around the world would have been glued to their sets between October 23 and November 4. This book tells the story of the Hungarian Revolution in 120 original documents, ranging from the minutes of the first meeting of Khrushchev with Hungarian bosses after Stalin's death in 1953 to Yeltsin's declaration made in 1992. Other documents include letters from Yuri Andropov, Soviet Ambassador in Budapest during and after the revolt. The great majority of the material appears in English for the first time, and almost all come from archives that were inaccessible until the 1990s.

The First Domino

Author: Johanna Cushing Granville
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585442980
Size: 68.92 MB
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The First Domino. http://www.johannagranville.com A Fascinating Analysis Based on Newly Declassified Documents from the Former USSR and Communist Bloc On October 23-24 and November 3-4, 1956, the Soviet Union invaded Hungary to reassert strict communist rule. The First Domino: International Decision Making during the Hungarian Crisis of 1956 is the first analytical monograph in English drawing on new archival collections from East bloc countries to reinterpret decision making during this Cold War crisis. Johanna Granville selects four key patterns of misperception as laid out by Columbia University political scientist Robert Jervis and shows how these patterns prevailed in the military crackdown and in other countries' reactions to it. Granville perceptively examines the statements and actions of Soviet Presidium members, the Hungarian leadership, U.S. policy makers, and even Yugoslav and Polish leaders. According to Granville, Soviet first secretary Nikita Khrushchev zigzagged ineptly between policy options with apparently little or no analysis of costs and risks, permitting Moscow's Eastern European satellites at times to subtly manipulate the Kremlin's decision making. Granville's discussions of Polish policy, Yugoslav actions, and the arduous process of normalization after the uprising show that the Soviets were preoccupied with stemming what many of them construed as a Western-encouraged attempt to undermine Eastern Europe's communist regimes. Granville concludes that the United States bears some responsibility for the events of 1956, as ill-advised U.S. covert actions may have convinced the Soviet leaders that the United States was attempting to weaken Soviet hegemony over Eastern Europe, although the Eisenhower administration actually intended only to sow confusion and dissatisfaction. This masterful study leads to the conclusion that the Hungarian Crisis in 1956 was most likely sustained by self-perpetuating misperceptions and suspicions among key countries. In short, Granville's multi-archival research tends to confirm the post-revisionists' theory about the cold war: it was everyone's fault and no one's fault. It resulted from the emerging bipolar structure of the international system, the power vacuum in Europe's center, and spiraling misconceptions.

Hungary 1956 Forty Years On

Author: Terry Cox
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780714647661
Size: 27.64 MB
Format: PDF
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Hungary 1956 Forty Years On. This collection of new articles offers a retrospective view of the events of the 1956 revolution in Hungary, the consequences they have had for Hungary's political development since, and the significance of 1956 in current Hungarian politics. Different articles draw on the findings of various kinds of research, including work in documentary and archival collections that have only recently been opened up, sociological survey research, and in some cases, on personal reminiscences as well.

Stalin

Author: Adam Bruno Ulam
Publisher: Tauris Parke Paperbacks
ISBN: 9781845114220
Size: 47.54 MB
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Stalin. In this biography of Joseph Stalin, Adam Ulam explores the secret of his power, the hold his memory still has over the imagination, the suffering he inflicted upon his own society, the unprecedented triumphs achieved by the Soviet Union under his leadership and the mysteries surrounding his death.

Twelve Days

Author: Victor Sebestyen
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0297865439
Size: 19.84 MB
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Twelve Days. The defining moment of the Cold War: 'The beginning of the end of the Soviet empire.' (Richard Nixon) The Hungarian Revolution in 1956 is a story of extraordinary bravery in a fight for freedom, and of ruthless cruelty in suppressing a popular dream. A small nation, its people armed with a few rifles and petrol bombs, had the will and courage to rise up against one of the world's superpowers. The determination of the Hungarians to resist the Russians astonished the West. People of all kinds, throughout the free world, became involved in the cause. For 12 days it looked, miraculously, as though the Soviets might be humbled. Then reality hit back. The Hungarians were brutally crushed. Their capital was devastated, thousands of people were killed and their country was occupied for a further three decades. The uprising was the defining moment of the Cold War: the USSR showed that it was determined to hold on to its European empire, but it would never do so without resistance. From the Prague Spring to Lech Walesa's Solidarity and the fall of the Berlin Wall, the tighter the grip of the communist bloc, the more irresistible the popular demand for freedom.

Prague Spring Prague Fall

Author: Miklós Kun
Publisher: Akademiai Kiado
ISBN: 9789630576086
Size: 80.43 MB
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Prague Spring Prague Fall. Mikls Kun spent nearly a decade researching the blank spots of the Prague Spring of 1968. The interviewees, who were on opposite sides of the barricade, reveal many secrets. Their stories are indispensable to the reconstruction process of what actually happened in Czechoslovakia in 1968. In the introduction of each interview, Kun confronts the results of historical research with the personal accounts of the interviews.

The Medieval Military Revolution

Author: Andrew Ayton
Publisher: I. B. Tauris
ISBN: 9781860643538
Size: 24.91 MB
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The Medieval Military Revolution. In recent years military history has moved out of its specialized ghetto and has come to be regarded as central to the mainstream study of the past. The concepts of a "military revolution" (consisting of the emergence of large infantry-based armies in early-modern Europe, the use of potent gunpowder weapons, and the rapid escalation of war costs) are now seen to have had far-reaching political and social consequences for European society. Indeed, war itself is now seen as a major engine of state development during this period. The essays in this volume set out to demonstrate the integration of military history with the broader concerns of historians. They also suggest that the military history of the Middle Ages was more dynamic than is often recognized, and that the military revolution needs to be interpreted by placing it in the context of rapid socio-political transformation.