University Planning And Architecture

Author: Jonathan Coulson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317613163
Size: 67.41 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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University Planning And Architecture. The environment of a university – what we term a campus – is a place with special resonance. They have long been the setting for some of history’s most exciting experiments in the design of the built environment. Christopher Wren at Cambridge, Le Corbusier at Harvard, and Norman Foster at the Free University Berlin: the calibre of practitioners who have shaped the physical realm of academia is superlative. Pioneering architecture and innovative planning make for vivid assertions of academic excellence, while the physical estate of a university can shape the learning experiences and lasting outlook of its community of students, faculty and staff. However, the mounting list of pressures – economic, social, pedagogical, technological – currently facing higher education institutions is rendering it increasingly challenging to perpetuate the rich legacy of campus design. In this strained context, it is more important than ever that effective use is made of these environments and that future development is guided in a manner that will answer to posterity. This book is the definitive compendium of the prestigious sphere of campus design, envisaged as a tool to help institutional leaders and designers to engage their campus’s full potential by revealing the narratives of the world’s most successful, time-honoured and memorable university estates. It charts the worldwide evolution of university design from the Middle Ages to the present day, uncovering the key episodes and themes that have conditioned the field, and through a series of case studies profiles universally-acclaimed campuses that, through their planning, architecture and landscaping, have made original, influential and striking contributions to the field. By understanding this history, present and future generations can distil important lessons for the future. The second edition includes revised text, many new images, and new case studies of the Central University of Venezuela and Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad.

Meetinghouses Of Early New England

Author: Peter Benes
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 1558499105
Size: 65.97 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Meetinghouses Of Early New England. Built primarily for public religious exercises, New England's wood-frame meetinghouses nevertheless were closely wedded to the social and cultural fabric of the neighborhood and fulfilled multiple secular purposes for much of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. As the only municipal building in the community, these structures provided locations for town and parish meetings. They also hosted criminal trials, public punishments and executions, and political and religious protests, and on occasion they served as defensive forts, barracks, hospitals, and places to store gunpowder. Today few of these once ubiquitous buildings survive. Based on site visits and meticulous documentary research, Meetinghouses of Early New England identifies more than 2,200 houses of worship in the region during the period from 1622 to 1830, bringing many of them to light for the first time. Within this framework Peter Benes addresses the stunning but ultimately impermanent blossoming of a New England "vernacular" tradition of ecclesiastical/ municipal architecture. He pinpoints the specific European antecedents of the seventeenth-century New England meetinghouse and traces their evolution through the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries into Congregational, Presbyterian, and Baptist churches heavily influenced by an Anglican precedent that made a place of worship a "house of God." Undertaking a parish-by-parish examination, Benes draws on primary sources--original records, diaries, and contemporary commentators--to determine which religious societies in the region advocated (or resisted) this evolution, tying key shifts in meetinghouse architecture to the region's shifting liturgical and devotional practices.

Henry Austin

Author: James F. O’Gorman
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 9780819569691
Size: 10.38 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Henry Austin. Winner of the Historic New England Book Prize (2009) Winner of the Henry-Russell Hitchcock Book Award (2010) Henry Austin’s (1804–1891) works receive consideration in books on nineteenth-century architecture, yet no book has focused scholarly attention on his primary achievements in New Haven, Connecticut, in Portland, Maine, and elsewhere. Austin was most active during the antebellum era, designing exotic buildings that have captured the imaginations of many for decades. James F. O’Gorman deftly documents Austin’s work during the 1840s and ’50s, the time when Austin was most productive and creative, and for which a wealth of material exists. The book is organized according to various building types: domestic, ecclesiastic, public, and commercial. O’Gorman helps to clarify what buildings should be attributed to the architect and comments on the various styles that went into his eclectic designs. Henry Austin is lavishly illustrated with 132 illustrations, including 32 in full color. Three extensive appendices provide valuable information on Austin’s books, drawings, and his office.

New York 1880

Author: Robert A. M. Stern
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781580930277
Size: 21.84 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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New York 1880. "New York 1880 definitively presents the buildings and master plans that transformed New York from a harbor town into a world-class metropolis. The book is generously illustrated with over 1,200 archival photographs that show the city as it was; through a broad range of primary sources - critics and writers, architects, planners, and government officials - New York City tells its own complex story."--BOOK JACKET.