Conversations With A Witch

Author: Lois Bourne
Publisher: Robert Hale
ISBN: 0719815576
Size: 65.96 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Conversations With A Witch. What is it like to be a witch? To be able to work magic, to heal, to see into the future; to be constantly approached by those in desperate need of help? Lois Bourne, psychic from childhood and a practising witch and occultist for over thirty years, has written a book of very personal reflections. She deals frankly with her own remarkable powers and examines the philosophy behind the Craft of the Wise. Exploring such New Age themes as psychometry and clairvoyance, precognition and the secret of invisibility has led her to many strange encounters and experiences. In the strong belief that mediumship was a vital part of early and medieval witchcraft, she describes the communications she has received on the subject of life after death, which have brought comfort and hope to many of those who have sought her help. A deeply moving book that shows how the mystical and the magical have always been inherent in human life and nature.

Witches Sluts Feminists

Author: Kristen J. Sollee
Publisher: Stone Bridge Press, Inc.
ISBN: 0996485287
Size: 35.21 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Witches Sluts Feminists. “Like being deemed a witch hundreds of years ago, being presumed a slut today is cause for ostracism, abuse, and death.” . . . Archetypes of “witch” and “slut” have been used to police female sexuality and punish women; now, feminists are reclaiming them as positive affirmations. This book unearths the sex positive feminist legacy of the witch in art, music, politics, and popular culture, connecting the fictional witch we love to emulate and fear with real women, past and present. Kristen J. Sollee is instructor at The New School and founding editrix of Slutist, an award-winning sex positive feminist website.

The Witches Ointment

Author: Thomas Hatsis
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1620554747
Size: 56.45 MB
Format: PDF
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The Witches Ointment. An exploration of the historical origins of the “witches’ ointment” and medieval hallucinogenic drug practices based on the earliest sources • Details how early modern theologians demonized psychedelic folk magic into “witches’ ointments” • Shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections all over the world as well as the practices and magical incantations necessary for their preparation • Examines the practices of medieval witches like Matteuccia di Francisco, who used hallucinogenic drugs in her love potions and herbal preparations In the medieval period preparations with hallucinogenic herbs were part of the practice of veneficium, or poison magic. This collection of magical arts used poisons, herbs, and rituals to bewitch, heal, prophesy, infect, and murder. In the form of psyche-magical ointments, poison magic could trigger powerful hallucinations and surrealistic dreams that enabled direct experience of the Divine. Smeared on the skin, these entheogenic ointments were said to enable witches to commune with various local goddesses, bastardized by the Church as trips to the Sabbat--clandestine meetings with Satan to learn magic and participate in demonic orgies. Examining trial records and the pharmacopoeia of witches, alchemists, folk healers, and heretics of the 15th century, Thomas Hatsis details how a range of ideas from folk drugs to ecclesiastical fears over medicine women merged to form the classical “witch” stereotype and what history has called the “witches’ ointment.” He shares dozens of psychoactive formulas and recipes gleaned from rare manuscripts from university collections from all over the world as well as the practices and magical incantations necessary for their preparation. He explores the connections between witches’ ointments and spells for shape shifting, spirit travel, and bewitching magic. He examines the practices of some Renaissance magicians, who inhaled powerful drugs to communicate with spirits, and of Italian folk-witches, such as Matteuccia di Francisco, who used hallucinogenic drugs in her love potions and herbal preparations, and Finicella, who used drug ointments to imagine herself transformed into a cat. Exploring the untold history of the witches’ ointment and medieval hallucinogen use, Hatsis reveals how the Church transformed folk drug practices, specifically entheogenic ones, into satanic experiences.

Conversations On The Rise Progress And Present State Of Wesleyan Missions In Various Parts Of The World With Historical And Descriptive Observations On The Respective Stations Occupied By The Society Illustrated Etc

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 55.27 MB
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Conversations On The Rise Progress And Present State Of Wesleyan Missions In Various Parts Of The World With Historical And Descriptive Observations On The Respective Stations Occupied By The Society Illustrated Etc.

Witch

Author: Glenn Puit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440625557
Size: 48.40 MB
Format: PDF
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Witch. Drawing on extensive interviews with the accused herself, here is the sordid, twisted, and surprising story of Brookey Lee West--a successful technical writer from Silicon Valley who went on a twenty year crime and killing spree.

No Argument For God

Author: John Wilkinson
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830868453
Size: 22.13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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No Argument For God. Religion is irrational! New atheists trumpet the claim loudly, so much so that it's become a sort of conventional wisdom. Professing your faith in God sounds increasingly like a confession of intellectual feebleness. Belief in God sounds as cute and quaint as it does pointless. John Wilkinson contends that the irrationality of faith is its greatest asset, because rationalism itself sets artificial limits on all that we've seen—which itself is hinting at something greater that can't be seen. In No Argument for God he turns the tables on the cult of reason, showing that it limits conversation to what happened, when what we really want is the why behind it. We settle for investigation when what we need is revelation—the answer to all our longings. Read this book and break though the gridlock of apologetic arguments to a life-giving encounter with the God who satisfies our minds and seeks our good.