Failing Our Veterans

Author: Mark Boulton
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814724876
Size: 75.11 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Failing Our Veterans. The original 1944 G.I. Bill holds a special place in the American imagination. In popular mythology, it stands as the capstone of the Greatest Generation narrative of World War II, a fitting reward for the nation's heroes. Given the almost universal acclaim afforded the bill, future generations of warriors might well have expected to receive similar remuneration for their sacrifice. But when soldiers of the Vietnam conflict shed their fatigues and returned home to civilian life, they found that their G.I. Bills fell well short of what many of them believed they had earned.In this first legislative history of the G.I. Bill during the Vietnam Era, Mark Boulton takes the story of veterans' politics beyond the 1944 G.I. Bill as he seeks to uncover the reasons why Vietnam veterans were less well compensated than their predecessors. In crafting their legislation, both conservative and liberal politicians of the Vietnam era wrestled with fundamental questions about the obligations of American citizenship. What does it mean to serve one's country? What does society owe those civilians it puts in uniform? Repeatedly, in answering those questions, lawmakers from both ends of the political spectrum found reasons to curb the generosity of the benefits offered.The G.I. Bills should play a central role in our understanding of the Vietnam veteran's post-service lives, just as they do for World War II veterans. Taking the story of the G.I. Bills beyond the World War II generation allows for a more complete understanding of the veteran experience in America.

Failing Our Veterans

Author: Mark Boulton
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814770282
Size: 18.60 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Failing Our Veterans. Returning Vietnam veterans had every reason to expect that the government would take care of their readjustment needs in the same way it had done for veterans of both World War II and Korea. But the Vietnam generation soon discovered that their G.I. Bills fell well short of what many of them believed they had earned. Mark Boulton’s groundbreaking study provides the first analysis of the legislative debates surrounding the education benefits offered under the Vietnam-era G.I. Bills. Specifically, the book explores why legislators from both ends of the political spectrum failed to provide Vietnam veterans the same generous compensation offered to veterans of previous wars. Failing Our Veterans should be essential reading to scholars of the Vietnam War, political history, or of social policy. Contemporary lawmakers should heed its historical lessons on how we ought to treat our returning veterans. Indeed, veterans wishing to fully understand their own homecoming experience will find great interest in the book’s conclusions.

Sing Not War

Author: James Alan Marten
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807834769
Size: 57.98 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Sing Not War. In Sing Not War, James Marten explores how the nineteenth century's "Greatest Generation" attempted to blend back into society and how their experiences were treated by non-veterans. --from publisher description

All Falling Faiths

Author: J. Harvie Wilkinson III
Publisher: Encounter Books
ISBN: 1594038929
Size: 16.27 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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All Falling Faiths. In this warm and intimate memoir Judge Wilkinson delivers a chilling message. The 1960s inflicted enormous damage on our country; even at this very hour we see the decade’s imprint in so much of what we say and do. The chapters reveal the harm done to the true meaning of education, to our capacity for lasting personal commitments, to our respect for the rule of law, to our sense of rootedness and home, to our desire for service, to our capacity for national unity, to our need for the sustenance of faith. Judge Wilkinson does not seek to lecture but to share in the most personal sense what life was like in the 1960s, and to describe the influence of those frighteningly eventful years upon the present day. Judge Wilkinson acknowledges the good things accomplished by the Sixties and nourishes the belief that we can learn from that decade ways to build a better future. But he asks his own generation to recognize its youthful mistakes and pleads with future generations not to repeat them. The author’s voice is one of love and hope for America. But our national prospects depend on facing honestly the full magnitude of all we lost during one momentous decade and of all we must now recover.

Our Latest Longest War

Author: Aaron B. O'Connell
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022626579X
Size: 59.36 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Our Latest Longest War. The first rule of warfare is to know one’s enemy. The second is to know thyself. More than fifteen years and three quarters of a trillion dollars after the US invasion of Afghanistan, it’s clear that the United States followed neither rule well. America’s goals in Afghanistan were lofty to begin with: dismantle al Qaeda, remove the Taliban from power, remake the country into a democracy. But not only did the mission come completely unmoored from reality, the United States wasted billions of dollars, and thousands of lives were lost. Our Latest Longest War is a chronicle of how, why, and in what ways the war in Afghanistan failed. Edited by historian and Marine lieutenant colonel Aaron B. O’Connell, the essays collected here represent nine different perspectives on the war—all from veterans of the conflict, both American and Afghan. Together, they paint a picture of a war in which problems of culture and an unbridgeable rural-urban divide derailed nearly every field of endeavor. The authors also draw troubling parallels to the Vietnam War, arguing that deep-running ideological currents in American life explain why the US government has repeatedly used armed nation-building to try to transform failing states into modern, liberal democracies. In Afghanistan, as in Vietnam, this created a dramatic mismatch of means and ends that neither money, technology, nor the force of arms could overcome. The war in Afghanistan has been the longest in US history, and in many ways, the most confounding. Few who fought in it think it has been worthwhile. These are difficult topics for any American or Afghan to consider, especially those who lost friends or family in it. This sobering history—written by the very people who have been fighting the war—is impossible to ignore.

Failing To Win

Author: Dominic D. P Johnson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674039173
Size: 74.97 MB
Format: PDF
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Failing To Win. How do people decide which country came out ahead in a war or a crisis? In Failing to Win, Dominic Johnson and Dominic Tierney dissect the psychological factors that predispose leaders, media, and the public to perceive outcomes as victories or defeats--often creating wide gaps between perceptions and reality.

Veterans

Author: Valerie Pfundstein
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780578135106
Size: 75.56 MB
Format: PDF
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Veterans. After learning about veterans in school, a young boy discovers that heroes live all around him: the butcher, barber, librarian, and many other members of his community who have helped protect our freedom and liberty by serving in various branches of the American military. An engaging rhyming picture book for readers of all ages that fosters mindfulness of and appreciation for the brave service men and women who are also our family, friends, and neighbors.

What Nurses Know Ptsd

Author: Mary E. Muscari, PhD, MSCr, CPNP, PMHCNS-BC, AFN-BC
Publisher: Demos Medical Publishing
ISBN: 1617050512
Size: 22.87 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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What Nurses Know Ptsd. An estimated 7.8% of all Americans will experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point in their lives. Roughly 5.2 million people have PTSD during the course of a given year. And PTSD can affect anyone - from war veterans and abuse victims to persons directly or indirectly traumatized by other catastrophes including crime, natural disasters, and serious accidents. Getting treatment as soon as possible after PTSD symptoms develop may help prevent PTSD from developing into a long-term condition. Treatment may take the form of medication, pychotherpay, or alternative medicine. What Nurses Know...PTSD Covers all the treatments available today. Examines the causes of the PTSD, describes the symptoms and the effects of PTSD on individuals with the condition and their families Looks at associated problems such as substance abuse Explains what makes PTSD different in children and adolescents Shows how to manage stress Shows how to talk to your health care provider Show how to get help - from both traditional and nontraditional sources About the Series Nurses hold a critical role in modern health care that goes beyond their day-to-day duties. They share more information with patients than any other provider group, and are alongside patients twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, offering understanding of complex health issues, holistic approaches to ailments, and advice for the patient that extends to the family. Nurses themselves are a powerful tool in the healing process. What Nurses Know gives down-to-earth information, addresses consumers as equal partners in their care, and explains clearly what readers need to know and wants to know to understand their condition and move forward with their lives.

Learning To Die In The Anthropocene

Author: Roy Scranton
Publisher: City Lights Publishers
ISBN: 087286670X
Size: 46.20 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Learning To Die In The Anthropocene. An Iraq War vet's bracing, visionary response to the challenge posed by global warming and his hope in the humanities.

Thank You For Your Service

Author: David Finkel
Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books
ISBN: 0374710961
Size: 38.23 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Thank You For Your Service. From a MacArthur Fellow and the author of The Good Soldiers, a profound look at life after war The wars of the past decade have been covered by brave and talented reporters, but none has reckoned with the psychology of these wars as intimately as the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Finkel. For The Good Soldiers, his bestselling account from the front lines of Baghdad, Finkel embedded with the men of the 2-16 Infantry Battalion during the infamous "surge," a grueling fifteen-month tour that changed them all forever. In Finkel's hands, readers can feel what these young men were experiencing, and his harrowing story instantly became a classic in the literature of modern war. In Thank You for Your Service, Finkel has done something even more extraordinary. Once again, he has embedded with some of the men of the 2-16—but this time he has done it at home, here in the States, after their deployments have ended. He is with them in their most intimate, painful, and hopeful moments as they try to recover, and in doing so, he creates an indelible, essential portrait of what life after war is like—not just for these soldiers, but for their wives, widows, children, and friends, and for the professionals who are truly trying, and to a great degree failing, to undo the damage that has been done. The story Finkel tells is mesmerizing, impossible to put down. With his unparalleled ability to report a story, he climbs into the hearts and minds of those he writes about. Thank You for Your Service is an act of understanding, and it offers a more complete picture than we have ever had of these two essential questions: When we ask young men and women to go to war, what are we asking of them? And when they return, what are we thanking them for? One of Publishers Weekly's Best Nonfiction Books of 2013 One of The Washington Post's Top 10 Books of the Year A New York Times Notable Book of 2013 An NPR Best Book of 2013 A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013