Land Allegiance In Revolutionary Georgia

Author: Leslie Hall
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820322629
Size: 11.11 MB
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Land Allegiance In Revolutionary Georgia. This history of the American Revolution in Georgia offers a thorough examination of how landownership issues complicated and challenged colonists’ loyalties. Despite underdevelopment and isolation, eighteenth-century Georgia was an alluring place, for it promised settlers of all social classes the prospect of affordable land--and the status that went with ownership. Then came the Revolution and its many threats to the orderly systems by which property was acquired and protected. As rebel and royal leaders vied for the support of Georgia’s citizens, says Leslie Hall, allegiance became a prime commodity, with property and the preservation of owners’ rights the requisite currency for securing it. As Hall shows, however, the war’s progress in Georgia was indeterminate; in fact, Georgia was the only colony in which British civil government was reestablished during the war. In the face of continued uncertainties--plundering, confiscation, and evacuation--many landowners’ desires for a strong, consistent civil authority ultimately transcended whatever political leanings they might have had. The historical irony here, Hall’s study shows, is that the most successful regime of Georgia’s Revolutionary period was arguably that of royalist governor James Wright. Land and Allegiance in Revolutionary Georgia is a revealing study of the self-interest and practical motivations in competition with a period’s idealism and rhetoric.

The Empire State Of The South

Author: Christopher C. Meyers
Publisher: Mercer University Press
ISBN: 9780881461107
Size: 27.70 MB
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The Empire State Of The South. This work offers a look at the history of Georgia through over 100 primary documents. ""The Empire State of the South: Georgia History in Documents and Essays"" offers teachers of Georgia history an alternative to the traditional narrative textbook. In this volume, students have the opportunity to read Georgia history rather than reading about Georgia history. Encompassing the entirety of Georgia history into the twenty-first century, ""The Empire State of the South"" is suitable for all courses on Georgia history. This text is divided into 16 chapters comprising 129 documents and 33 essays on various topics of Georgia history. The primary documents represent a wide range of genres, including speeches, newspaper columns, letters, treaties, laws, proclamations, state constitutions, court decisions, and many others. Some documents outline general themes or movements in Georgia history while others address more narrow issues. The thirty-three essays are excerpts from larger pieces that were written by specialists in Georgia history. Each chapter consists of several parts. First is a short narrative introduction. The second part contains the documents themselves. Following the documents are two essays written by historians regarding some topic relevant to the chapter. At the end of each chapter is a short list of suggested readings. The documents themselves range from the usual: state constitutions, laws, and speeches, to the inordinate: plans for constructing what is regarded as the state's first concrete home, a corny campaign song for Eugene Talmadge, an attempt by the General Assembly in 1897 to ban the playing of football, and a 1962 letter Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote from an Albany prison that preceded his more well-known Birmingham letter. Georgia has indeed had a colorful history and ""The Empire State of the South"" tells that story.

Coastal Encounters

Author: Richmond Forrest Brown
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803262676
Size: 78.37 MB
Format: PDF
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Coastal Encounters. Coastal Encounters brings together leading experts and emerging scholars to provide a portrait of the complex and fascinating Gulf South in the eighteenth century. The book depicts the remarkable transitions--demographic, cultural, social, political, and economic--that took place from the Atlantic coast of Florida to the Gulf coast of Mexico during this period. These changes are examined from multiple perspectives, including those of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans; colonizers and colonized; men and women. Daniel H. Usner provides a comprehensive essay on the historiography of the colonial Gulf South. Amy Turner Bushnell and Jane Landers explore cultural collisions and changing geopolitics in eighteenth-century Florida. David Wheat and Karl Davis treat African and Native American agency in southwest Alabama. Greg O'Brien interprets Choctaw and Chickasaw diplomacy in the transition from French to British rule. Shannon Lee Dawdy and Virginia Gould skillfully portray early New Orleans, while H. Sophie Burton and Andrew McMichael do the same for Natchitoches and Baton Rouge, respectively. Armando C. Alonzo portrays the thriving Mexican colony of Nuevo Santander. In the concluding essay, noted colonial scholar Ida Altman reflects on the significance of these essays and suggests new scholarly directions.

America History And Life

Author: Eric H. Boehm
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 67.87 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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America History And Life. Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Stories Of Georgia

Author: Joel Chandler Harris
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465525122
Size: 77.82 MB
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Stories Of Georgia. In preparing the pages that follow, the writer has had in view the desirability of familiarizing the youth of Georgia with the salient facts of the State's history in a way that shall make the further study of that history a delight instead of a task. The ground has been gone over before by various writers, but the narratives that are here retold, and the characterizations that are here attempted, have not been brought together heretofore. They lie wide apart in volumes that are little known and out of print. The stories and the characterizations have been grouped together so as to form a series of connecting links in the rise and progress of Georgia; yet it must not be forgotten that these links are themselves connected with facts and events in the State's development that are quite as interesting, and of as far-reaching importance, as those that have been narrated here. Some such suggestion as this, it is hoped, will cross the minds of young students, and lead them to investigate for themselves the interesting intervals that lie between. It is unfortunately true that there is no history of Georgia in which the dry bones of facts have been clothed with the flesh and blood of popular narrative. Colonel Charles C. Jones saw what was needed, and entered upon the task of writing the history of the State with characteristic enthusiasm. He had not proceeded far, however, when the fact dawned upon his mind that such a work as he contemplated must be for the most part a labor of love. He felt the influence of cold neglect from every source that might have been expected to afford him aid and encouragement. He was almost compelled to confine himself to a bare recital of facts, for he had reason to know that, at the end of his task, public inappreciation was awaiting him. And yet it seems to the present writer that every person interested in the growth and development of the republic should turn with eager attention to a narrative embodying the events that have marked the progress of Georgia. It was in this State that some of the most surprising and spectacular scenes of the Revolution took place. In one corner of Georgia those who were fighting for the independence of the republic made their last desperate stand; and if they had surrendered to the odds that faced them, the battle of King's Mountain would never have been fought, Greene's southern campaign would have been crippled, and the struggle for liberty in the south would have ended in smoke.