Proceedings

Author: Cambridge Antiquarian Society (Cambridge, England)
Publisher:
ISBN:
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Proceedings.

Proceeding Of The Cambridge Antiquarian Society 1888 1891 Vol 7

Author: Cambridge Antiquarian Society
Publisher: Forgotten Books
ISBN: 9781334402289
Size: 52.40 MB
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Proceeding Of The Cambridge Antiquarian Society 1888 1891 Vol 7. Excerpt from Proceeding of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 1888-1891, Vol. 7: With Communications Made to the Society Of the Bible, as a complete Book, illustrated with varying cycles of pictures, there are many types. The Library of Corpus Christi supplies us with specimens of two of these. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Proceedings Of The Cambridge Antiquarian Society Vol 14

Author: Cambridge Antiquarian Society
Publisher: Forgotten Books
ISBN: 9781333716479
Size: 20.72 MB
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Proceedings Of The Cambridge Antiquarian Society Vol 14. Excerpt from Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, Vol. 14: 18 October 6 December, 1909; With Communications Made to the Society, Michaelmas Term, 1909 The use of hair powder, Of some colour or other, can be traced through the Saxon and Mediaeval periods. During the reign Of Queen Elizabeth we find it was a common practice for the ladies Of the Court to dye or powder their hair yellow, in compliment to their Queen, whose natural hair was Of this colour, as was also that Of her cousin and rival Mary Queen Of Scots. It is recorded that Queen Elizabeth had as many as 80 changes Of false hair, and the Scottish Queen had such a number of changes Of wigs that one of her favourite maids, Mary Seaton, could deck the head Of her Royal Mistress with a different wig or false hair every day. The use Of wigs and hair powder was not common in the reigns of James I and Charles I, but on his Restoration after his exile on the continent Charles II introduced into England many of the things and fashions with which he was familiar during his residence in France. Among these were enormous wigs which soon took the place Of natural hair, which had been more generally worn in this country during the previous reigns. The portraits of courtiers and gentlemen with the enormous flowing wigs seem to us uncomfortable and absurd. Some faint idea Of their size may be gathered from those still worn, in a very modified form, by our Judges. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.