Racial Frontiers

Author: Arnoldo De Le N
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826322722
Size: 19.16 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 916

Download Read Online

Racial Frontiers. Once neglected, racial minorities are now the focus of intense interest among historians of the American West, who have come to recognize the roles of African American, Chinese, and Mexican people in shaping the frontier.Racial Frontiersis both a highly original work, particularly in its emphasis on racial minority women, and a masterful synthesis of the literature in this young field.De León depicts a U.S. West populated by settlers anticipating opportunities for upward mobility, jockeying for position as they adapted to new surroundings, and adjusting to new political and economic systems. Minority groups discarded unworkable political traditions that had followed them from their homelands and sought to participate in a democracy that they trusted would see to their well-being. Many embraced capitalism in preference to the economic systems they had left behind but refused to give up their cultural traditions. The result was a U.S. West of many colors. Known as a skilled writer, De León tells countless stories of the lives of men and women to guide the readers through his narrative. Personal histories and revealing quotations illustrate the struggles and victories of the newcomers, enriching our understanding of the settlement of the trans-Mississippi West since the middle of the nineteenth century.

Hispanics In The American West

Author: Jorge Iber
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1851096795
Size: 21.17 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 3026

Download Read Online

Hispanics In The American West. Looks at the history of Hispanic peoples in the American West from the period of Spanish colonization. This work portrays the daily lives, struggles, and triumphs of Spanish-speaking peoples from the arrival of Spanish conquistadors. It highlights moments such as the Mexican-American War, the coming of the railroad, World War II, and others.

Major Problems In Texas History

Author: Sam W. Haynes
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1305177886
Size: 61.21 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 4005

Download Read Online

Major Problems In Texas History. Designed to encourage critical thinking about history, the Major Problems in American History series introduces students to both primary sources and analytical essays on important topics in US history. This collection, designed for courses on Texas history or the history of southwest, covers the subject's entire chronological span. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Aspects Of American History

Author: Simon Henderson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134098731
Size: 41.75 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6563

Download Read Online

Aspects Of American History. Aspects of American History examines major themes, personalities and issues across American history, using topic focused essays. Each chapter focuses on key events and time periods within a broad framework looking at liberty and equality, the role of government and national identity. The volume engages with its central themes through a broad ranging examination of aspects of the American past, including discussions of political history, foreign policy, presidential leadership and the construction of national memory. In each essay, Simon Henderson: introduces fresh angles to traditional topics consolidates recent research in themed essays analyzes views of different historians offers an interpretive rather than narrative approach gives concise treatment to complex issues. Including an introduction which places key themes in context, this book enables readers to make comparisons and trace major thematic developments across American history.

Race Religion Region

Author: Fay Botham
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816524785
Size: 54.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6718

Download Read Online

Race Religion Region. Racial and religious groups have played a key role in shaping the American West, yet scholars have for the most part ignored how race and religion have influenced regional identity. In this collection, eleven contributors explore the intersections of race, religion, and region to show how they transformed the West. From the Punjabi Mexican Americans of California to the European American shamans of Arizona to the Mexican Chinese of the borderlands, historical meanings of race in the American West are complex and are further complicated by religious identities. This book moves beyond familiar stereotypes to achieve a more nuanced understanding of race while also showing how ethnicity formed in conjunction with religious and regional identity. The chapters demonstrate how religion shaped cultural encounters, contributed to the construction of racial identities, and served as a motivating factor in the lives of historical actors. The opening chapters document how religion fostered community in Los Angeles in the first half of the twentieth century. The second section examines how physical encounters—such as those involving Chinese immigrants, Hermanos Penitentes, and Pueblo dancers—shaped religious and racial encounters in the West. The final essays investigate racial and religious identity among the Latter-day Saints and southern California Muslims. As these contributions clearly show, race, religion, and region are as critical as gender, sexuality, and class in understanding the melting pot that is the West. By depicting the West as a unique site for understanding race and religion, they open a new window on how we view all of America.

Porous Borders

Author: Julian Lim
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146963550X
Size: 50.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7774

Download Read Online

Porous Borders. With the railroad's arrival in the late nineteenth century, immigrants of all colors rushed to the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, transforming the region into a booming international hub of economic and human activity. Following the stream of Mexican, Chinese, and African American migration, Julian Lim presents a fresh study of the multiracial intersections of the borderlands, where diverse peoples crossed multiple boundaries in search of new economic opportunities and social relations. However, as these migrants came together in ways that blurred and confounded elite expectations of racial order, both the United States and Mexico resorted to increasingly exclusionary immigration policies in order to make the multiracial populations of the borderlands less visible within the body politic, and to remove them from the boundaries of national identity altogether. Using a variety of English- and Spanish-language primary sources from both sides of the border, Lim reveals how a borderlands region that has traditionally been defined by Mexican-Anglo relations was in fact shaped by a diverse population that came together dynamically through work and play, in the streets and in homes, through war and marriage, and in the very act of crossing the border.

A Promising Problem

Author: Carlos Kevin Blanton
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477309039
Size: 45.61 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6612

Download Read Online

A Promising Problem. Chicana/o history has reached an intriguing juncture. While academic and intellectual studies are embracing new, highly nuanced perspectives on race, class, gender, education, identity, and community, the field itself continues to be viewed as a battleground, subject to attacks from outside academia by those who claim that the discipline promotes racial hatred and anti-Americanism. Against a backdrop of deportations and voter suppression targeting Latinos, A Promising Problem presents the optimistic voices of scholars who call for sophisticated solutions while embracing transnationalism and the reality of multiple, overlapping identities. Showcasing a variety of new directions, this anthology spans topics such as growth and reassessment in Chicana/o history manifested in a disruption of nationalism and geographic essentialism, the impact of legal history, interracial relations and the experiences of Latino subpopulations in the US South, race and the politics of religious history, transborder feminism in the early twentieth century, and aspirations for a field that increasingly demonstrates the relational dynamics of cultural production. As they reflect on the state of their field, the contributors offer significant insights into sociology, psychology, anthropology, political science, education, and literature, while tracing the history of activism throughout the last century and debating the very concepts of “Chicano” and “Chicano history.” Although the political landscape is fraught with closed-off rhetoric, A Promising Problem encourages diversity of thought and opens the possibilities of historical imagination.

Foreigners In Their Native Land

Author: David J. Weber
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826335104
Size: 51.52 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3989

Download Read Online

Foreigners In Their Native Land. Most recent writing about Mexican Americans deals only with the twentieth century. This book provides the much-needed historical perspective that is essential for a full understanding of the present. Dozens of selections from firsthand accounts, introduced by the editor's knowledgeable essays capture the flavor and mood of the Mexican American experience in the Southwest from the time the first pioneers came north from Mexico. The first edition was selected as aChoice"Outstanding Academic Book of the Year" and received the following accolades: "An excellent job of illuminating the early historical experience of Mexicans living in the United States."--Western Historical Quarterly "Weber . . . has done more than compile a first-rate anthology . . . he has done much to put the selected accounts into a meaningful historical framework. This coupled with excellent documentary choices and extensive notes makes it the single best volume for understanding the Mexican American experience in the nineteenth-century Southwest."--Choice

Chinese Mexicans

Author: Julia María Schiavone Camacho
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882593
Size: 21.79 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3703

Download Read Online

Chinese Mexicans. At the turn of the twentieth century, a wave of Chinese men made their way to the northern Mexican border state of Sonora to work and live. The ties--and families--these Mexicans and Chinese created led to the formation of a new cultural identity: Chinese Mexican. During the tumult of the Mexican Revolution of 1910, however, anti-Chinese sentiment ultimately led to mass expulsion of these people. Julia Maria Schiavone Camacho follows the community through the mid-twentieth century, across borders and oceans, to show how they fought for their place as Mexicans, both in Mexico and abroad. Tracing transnational geography, Schiavone Camacho explores how these men and women developed a strong sense of Mexican national identity while living abroad--in the United States, briefly, and then in southeast Asia where they created a hybrid community and taught their children about the Mexican homeland. Schiavone Camacho also addresses how Mexican women challenged their legal status after being stripped of Mexican citizenship because they married Chinese men. After repatriation in the 1930s-1960s, Chinese Mexican men and women, who had left Mexico with strong regional identities, now claimed national cultural belonging and Mexican identity in ways they had not before.

North To Aztlan

Author: Arnoldo De Leon
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN:
Size: 40.28 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 6258

Download Read Online

North To Aztlan. Traces the history of Mexican Americans in the United States, examining the native roots, culture, society, lifestyle, politics, and art of Mexican Americans, and discussing their contributions to American history and mainstream culture, immigration before and after the twentieth century, and other related topics.