Saving Lives

Author: Sandy Summers
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199337063
Size: 49.19 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6560

Download Read Online

Saving Lives. Examines the portrayal of nurses in the mass media, and the misconceptions that it fosters in the way that they are perceived by patients in comparison to the vital role that they actually play in saving lives.

Causing Death And Saving Lives

Author: Jonathan Glover
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141949732
Size: 59.71 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3937

Download Read Online

Causing Death And Saving Lives. The moral problems of abortion, infanticide, suicide, euthanasia, capital punshiment, war and othe life-or-death choices.

Saving Lives

Author: Mitchell R. Hammer
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275992958
Size: 13.96 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5639

Download Read Online

Saving Lives. Offers a practical approach to handling crisis negotiations in hostage situations

Setting Limits Saving Lives

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 12.40 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3090

Download Read Online

Setting Limits Saving Lives. Impaired driving is the most frequently committed violent crime in America. Every 30 minutes, someone in this country dies in an alcohol-related crash. There are four key laws that have been proven effective in the fight against impaired driving: illegal per se, administrative license revocation, zero tolerance, and .08 BAC. This booklet describes the .08 BAC law, and makes the case for adopting it in every state. At .08 BAC, all drivers, even experienced ones, show impairment in driving ability.

Taking Action Saving Lives

Author: Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199886741
Size: 15.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2119

Download Read Online

Taking Action Saving Lives. In the United States alone, industrial and agricultural toxins account for about 60,000 avoidable cancer deaths annually. Pollution-related health costs to Americans are similarly staggering: $13 billion a year from asthma, $351 billion from cardiovascular disease, and $240 billion from occupational disease and injury. Most troubling, children, the poor, and minorities bear the brunt of these health tragedies. Why, asks Kristin Shrader-Frechette, has the government failed to protect us, and what can we do about it? In this book, at once brilliant and accessible, Shrader-Frechette reveals how politicians, campaign contributors, and lobbyists--and their power over media, advertising, and public relations--have conspired to cover up environmental disease and death. She also shows how science and regulators themselves are frequently "captured" by well-funded polluters and special interests. But most important, the author puts both the blame--and the solution--on the shoulders of ordinary citizens. She argues that everyone, especially in a democracy, has a duty to help prevent avoidable environmental deaths, to remain informed about, and involved in, public-health and environmental decision-making. Toward this end, she outlines specific, concrete ways in which people can contribute to life-saving reforms, many of them building on recommendations of the American Public Health Association. As disturbing as it is, Shrader-Frechette's message is ultimately hopeful. Calling for a new "democratic revolution," she reminds us that while only a fraction of the early colonists supported the American Revolution, that tiny group managed to change the world. Her book embodies the conviction that we can do the same for environmental health, particularly if citizens become the change they seek. "Timely, accessible, and written with enviable clarity and passion. A distinguished philosopher sounds an ethical call to arms to prevent illness and death from pollution." --Sheila Jasanoff, Harvard University "Influential and impressive. A must-read." --Nicholas A. Ashford, Massachusetts Institute of Technology "By one of America's foremost philosophers and public intellectuals; immensely readable, courageous, often startling, insightful." --Richard Hiskes, University of Connecticut "Like Rachel Carson's Silent Spring--brilliant, brave." --Sylvia Hood Washington, University of Illinois, Chicago "A blistering account of how advocacy must be brought to bear on issues of justice and public health." -- Jeffrey Kahn, University of Minnesota "No other author can so forcefully bring together ethical analysis, government policy, and environmental science. Outstanding." --Colleen Moore, University of Wisconsin

Saving Lives Saving Honor

Author: Jeremy C. Schwendiman
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 0615193234
Size: 80.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1590

Download Read Online

Saving Lives Saving Honor. The day-by-day activities of the 39th Evacuation Hospital during World War II: from its inception at Camp Atterbury, In, to its deactivation at Camp Miles Standish, MA.

Saving Lives Buying Time

Author: Committee on the Economics of Antimalarial Drugs
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309092183
Size: 59.32 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4638

Download Read Online

Saving Lives Buying Time . For more than 50 years, low-cost antimalarial drugs silently saved millions of lives and cured billions of debilitating infections. Today, however, these drugs no longer work against the deadliest form of malaria that exists throughout the world. Malaria deaths in sub-Saharan Africa-currently just over one million per year-are rising because of increased resistance to the old, inexpensive drugs. Although effective new drugs called "artemisinins" are available, they are unaffordable for the majority of the affected population, even at a cost of one dollar per course. Saving Lives, Buying Time: Economics of Malaria Drugs in an Age of Resistance examines the history of malaria treatments, provides an overview of the current drug crisis, and offers recommendations on maximizing access to and effectiveness of antimalarial drugs. The book finds that most people in endemic countries will not have access to currently effective combination treatments, which should include an artemisinin, without financing from the global community. Without funding for effective treatment, malaria mortality could double over the next 10 to 20 years and transmission will intensify.